Category Archives: Regency

The Noble Guardian by Michelle Griep

Series:  The Bow Street Runners Trilogy, Book 3

Publication Date: June 01, 2019

Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Inc.

ARC from Netgalley.com, the author, and Shiloh Press, an imprint of Barbour Publishing

“Life is more than good ideas. It’s the risks that return greater results.”

–Samuel Thatcher

 Michelle Griep finishes off the Bow Street Runners Trilogy with her best hero yet, Captain Samuel Thatcher.  Be still, my beating heart!! A dark, silent man, scarred and a bit short on conversational skills, Samuel has little time in his busy life as an officer of the law to escort women and babies all over the countryside. However, he finds himself doing just that.

Abigail Gilbert, a lovely young woman from a relatively well-off family, departs on a journey to marry a virtual stranger in order to escape her unhappy family life. Little does Abigail dream that her life will take on the twists and turns she encounters along the way. Abby finds herself on the adventure of a lifetime. The bride-to-be finds herself a kidnap victim, a babysitter, and nursemaid before the trip comes to an end.

Packed with action, adventure, extremely bad guys, sweet babies, dark, handsome heroes, and romance, this book entertained me right from the start.  Can these two damaged people find a way to make a life for themselves? Don’t miss this last book in the trilogy. It is an excellent read that I highly recommend for people who enjoy historical fiction, Regency fiction, and Christian fiction.

This ARC copy was received from Netgalley.com and Shiloh Press, an imprint of Barbour Publishing. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

#TheNobleGuardian  #NetGalley  #amreading  #amreviewing

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Filed under Book Reviews, christian fiction, Historical Fiction, Regency, Romance

Someone to Trust by Mary Balogh

Series: A Westcott Novel, #5

Publication Date: 27 Nov 2018

Publisher: Berkley

ARC from Netgalley.com and Berkley

“No one escapes, even those who may appear to others to live charmed lives. But we all have the choice of whether to be defined by the negatives in our lives or to make of our present and future and our very selves what we want them to be.”    
               -Elizabeth

Mary Balogh continues the captivating Wescott family saga in this fifth novel set at Christmas time in the English countryside. After a Christmas holiday that begins with an unexpected wedding, the entire Westcott family, plus a few additions, are assembled at Brambledean Court to celebrate. Alexander Westcott, Earl of Riverdale, and his new wife, Wren, are doing their best to promote solid, loving familial relations among their mixed clan during this holiday.

The story centers around Colin Handrich, Baron Hodges, a pleasant, good looking young man of twenty-six with a title and a nice fortune, and Elizabeth Westcott Overfield,  the widowed Lady Overfield, a slender, fair haired beauty in her mid-thirties. As these two young people move through their holiday slightly at a distance from the others due to their own particular circumstances, they find themselves frequently in each other’s company. A blithe promise is set between the two to dance the first waltz of every ball of the coming Season.

Thus begins a Season filled with adventure and turmoil for Colin and Elizabeth. Read the story of this older woman and younger man to see if they can find a way through the very difficult maze of society and familial chaos that ensues. Rich with romantic detail and filled with the love of family, this book is a delightful read to get you in the Christmas spirit.

This ARC copy was received from Netgalley.com and Berkley. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

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The Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd

Publication Date: April 10, 2018

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ARC copy from Netgalley and Thomas Nelson Publishers

 

“Everyone makes mistakes in their life. It is how you respond to them and learn from them that matters.”

                                                                                                 -Henry Stockton

Love, loyalty, and forgiveness play lead roles in this latest Regency novel from Sarah E. Ladd. The story is set in Amberdale, a small village in Yorkshire, England in January of 1812. Tension continues to increase in the village between the local weavers and the millworkers and owners. The two factions cannot get along with each other as one’s progress spells the end of the other’s future. Henry Stockton, heir to the Stockton Mills, returns home after serving in the war a changed young man.

Kate Dearborne, a busy young woman who oversees a good portion of her father’s weaving business, struggles to accept the role her father now demands of her as a subservient and minor player in the business. In a home already broken by her father’s demands, Kate feels the conflicts in every aspect of her life. Her beloved brother, Charles, left home years earlier and went to work for the Stockton Mills as he anticipated a changing way of life coming to an end.

This changing way of life—the conflict between men and machinery—creates vast adjustments for many people in the village. The story examines the values of family loyalty, business loyalty, love, and forgiveness. As Kate, the weaver’s daughter, and Charles, the mill owner, discover an attraction to each other that goes beyond the boundaries set by their families, they must decide where their loyalties lie and where the future will take them.

This ARC copy was received from Thomas Nelson and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

 

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The Ladies of Ivy Cottage by Julie Klassen

Series: Tales from Ivy Hill, Book 2

Publication Date: December 2017

Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group

ARC Copy from Netgalley.com and Bethany House

The fall of 1820 finds Rachel Ashford, the impoverished daughter from Thornvale Manor in Ivy Hill, teaching etiquette at her friend, Mercy Groves’ school for girls at Ivy Cottage. Dependent upon Mercy and her aunt Matilda for a home, Rachel tries to make herself useful. However, she soon finds out that teaching is not her calling.   The Ladies Tea and Knitting Society, a group of enterprising business women from the village, brainstorm the idea of a circulating library for the village utilizing Rachel’s inheritance of her father’s library. Thus begins Rachel’s career as a librarian.

The story encompasses so many of the village characters, each with their own unique personality and history. We meet Jane Bell, Rachel’s and Mercy’s good friend; James Drake, the gentlemen who is building a new inn in the area; Sir Timothy Brockwell, an upstanding young man who resides in the area and past beau of Rachel. Everyone has a story and some of the stories have a bit of intrigue and mystery tucked into them.

This second book picks up life in the village with all its quirkiness and charm just where it left off in the first story. I really enjoy the townspeople of Ivy Hill and the ladies of Ivy Cottage are unique and special in their own way. Some interesting themes such as the high price of being honest, the cost of accepting charity and grace, and the surrender of one’s dreams run through the novel giving it depth in addition to its entertainment value.

A charming Regency read that still leaves plenty of events to occur and characters to be developed with time! Looking forward to book three!

This ARC copy was received from Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

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Filed under Book Reviews, christian fiction, Historical Fiction, Regency, Romance

A Stranger at Fellsworth by Sarah E. Ladd

 

Series: Treasures of Surrey, Book 3

Publication Date: May 2017

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ARC copy from Netgalley and Thomas Nelson Publishers

 

“Every person is on a journey. You.  Me.  Mr. Thorley. Miss Stillworth. Every single one of us.” …. “Some of us will learn and grow, and some will struggle and fail. I know I certainly could not judge another. All we can do is be there for the ones who have been put into our lives.”

-Crosley

Suspense, romance and a bit of faith deliver a great story in this latest novel by Sarah E. Ladd. Readers of Regency novels will definitely engage with this story. Intriguing characters, dark plots, and subtle romance tie the story together quite well!

Annabelle Thorley,  a young gentile woman, finds her life changing drastically as her family goods are carted from their pleasant home and sold by her brother who has inherited the family estate. Bills to settle, debts to be paid, and unsavory friends add to Annabelle’s brother Thomas’s problems. Thomas decides to use Annabelle as a means of getting himself out of debt and out of trouble.

Desperation drives Annabelle to seek shelter at Fellsworth School run by her Uncle Edmund, whom she has not seen in ten years. Owen Locke, a groundskeeper from the neighboring estate, steps in and provides safe transportation to Fellsworth for Annabelle and her ladies maid, Crosley.

Uncle Edmund is quite willing to provide the two women with jobs and a safe place to live. Thus begins a changed life for Annabelle and Crosley both. One will use the change to her advantage and one will use it unwisely.

Once again Sarah Ladd examines in depth the significance of family, morals, and the true meaning of home. Annabelle and Owen have both suffered loss and difficulties. Annabelle’s upbringing left her ill suited to the life with which she winds up, but she makes an effort to adapt and do the best she can with the skills she has. Owen learns that he is capable of a great deal of patience and that his patience and hard work do pay off in the end. Annabelle and Owen learn that home is where you make it and family is sometimes what we choose, not what we are born to.

This ARC copy was received from Thomas Nelson and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.  

 

 

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The Innkeeper of Ivy Hill by Julie Klassen

klassen-julie-the-innkeeper-of-ivy-hill

Series: Tales from Ivy Hill, Book 1

 Publication Date: Coming December 6, 2016

Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group

ARC Copy from Netgalley.com and Bethany House

 

 

 

The spring of 1820 started out rather mundanely for Jane Fairmont Bell as she continued to hide out in her small lodging next to the Bell, a coaching inn, in Wiltshire, England. Jane’s life had taken some unexpected turns in the past year upon the suspicious and slightly mysterious death of her young husband who had ran the inn along with his mother, the rather imposing Thora Bell. This quiet, routine existence was about to abruptly end.

With the arrival of Thora back at the inn and the mysterious disappearance of funds, Jane must step up and figure out whether or not she is capable of being an innkeeper and businesswoman. The storyline evolves around Jane’s awakening to the reality of maintaining the inn and her employees and her evolving relationship with her mother-in-law, which had previously been rather touchy.  With the assistance of a couple of interesting male acquaintances, Jane begins to find her way forward in a world that was not always kind to women.

Once again, Julie Klassen mixes a variety of interesting characters with unique personalities into the tale. This book is the first in a series, Tales from Ivy Hill. I am looking forward to see which of the characters is highlighted in the next book. They are a slightly eccentric group and some have a hidden side that has not been fully developed in this story.

I enjoyed the book very much. An intriguing Regency read that leaves plenty of questions to be answered and characters to be developed with time!

This ARC copy was received from Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

4/5

 

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Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Fiction, Inspirational Fiction, Regency

Dawn at Emberwilde by Sarah E. Ladd

Ladd, Sarah  Dawn at Emberwilde

Series: A Treasures of Surrey novel

Publication Date: May 2016

Publisher: Thomas Nelson and Netgalley.com

ARC copy

 

  

  “There is nothing quite so lovely as dawn at Emberwilde.”

                     –Burns, ladies maid to Isabel Creston

Moving from life as a student to life as a teacher at the Fellsworth School changed very little in Isabel Creston’s life. The uniforms were a bit more drab and your hair had to be constantly tidy, but the same rigid regulations remained. Isabel is a beautiful young woman who likes to daydream and push the rules to the limits most days.

Nothing prepares Isabel, an orphan who serves as guardian to her younger half sister, for the arrival of the tall, handsome stranger that has been sent to escort her to Emberwilde to meet family that she never knew existed.

The novel gains momentum quickly with an intriguing plot that encompasses ghosts in the forest, smuggling, and mysterious events that occur without explanation. To further complicate the story, Isabel quickly learns that love often wears many faces. Nothing is quite as it seems at Emberwilde Hall.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The hint of romance appealed to me and the mysteries throughout the book kept my attention. The characters are reminiscent of Jane Austen’s characters and the setting and dark mysteries offer a bit of Charlotte Bronte. Read Dawn at Emberwilde to find out what mysteries are lurking in the forest!  Great book for readers of historical, Regency, and inspirational fiction!

Sarah Ladd’s website

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