Tag Archives: Waterbrook Multnomah

No Ocean Too Wide by Carrie Turansky

Publication Date: June 2019

Publisher: Waterbrook Multnomah

ARC copy from Netgalley and Waterbrook Multnomah

“Her experiences in the last few months had sealed this truth in her heart; family bonds were not meant to be broken.”

                            –Laura McAlister

Sadness and sorrow overshadow this very interesting historical story interlaced with hope and love as well. The story highlights the sad lack of law and oversight at the time in dealing with children whose families had been beset by illness and/or poverty. The children, most often removed from their homes, were frequently shipped to Canada as farm and domestic laborers. They became known as British Home Children. This very unique story about these children is based on historical facts woven into a fiction story highlighting one family.

Set in 1909 London, the book tells the tale of the McAlister family, a family that includes a mother and four siblings. Laura, the eldest of the McAlister siblings, is twenty-one and working as a ladies maid north of London. Katie and Garth are fourteen, both trying to assist the family finances in one way or another and the youngest, Grace, is seven. The McAlister family falls upon hard times, particularly when Mrs. McAlister falls extremely ill.

Little does she know what lies ahead for her three younger children as they are taken into group homes for poor and destitute children. The home then ships them to Canada without their mother’s knowledge or approval. The prejudice the children endure as a result of being British Home Children is astounding. They were often treated very poorly as a result of the prejudice, misinformation resulting from the disregard and lack of rules in the emigration system and lack of child labor laws.

The book details Laura’s search and journey to find her siblings and return them to their family and home. Her decisions, often made quickly, and her choices, although done for the right reason, are not always well thought out, but her heart is in the right place. How far would you go to try and save your family?  Read this very unique story that tells a tale similar to the orphan trains utilized in the United States during the years 1854-1929.

This ARC copy was received from Waterbrook Multnomah and Netgalley.com. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

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Filed under Book Reviews, christian fiction, Historical Fiction, Inspirational Fiction

Ever Faithful by Karen Barnett

 

Series: A Vintage National Park Novel #3

Publication Date:  18 June 2019

Waterbrook

ARC from Waterbrook and Netgalley.com

 “If you don’t believe in yourself, who will?”

–Elsie Brookes

Join me for an adventurous tale that takes the reader on a ramble through another of our nation’s great national parks, Yellowstone, for a peek at park life during the 1930’s. Karen Barnett once again constructs a unique novel set during a trying time in our nation’s history, the Great Depression, and integrates faith, fiction, and historical background and detail into the core of the story.

April 1933 finds Nate Webber, a young man from Brooklyn, New York, headed west to Yellowstone to fulfill his six month obligation to the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Although not exactly voluntary, Nate finds himself grateful for the opportunity to provide for his mother and siblings back home. He and his fellow CCC members, all city boys, have much to learn upon their arrival at the park. Some lessons are harder to learn than others for the boys, but they pull together and perform their jobs better than most would have expected.

Over the course of the summer their adventures lead them everywhere from snow covered hills for logging to fighting forest fires to save the majestic forests and hotels of the park. Along with the more serious side of their jobs, the evenings offered entertainment and good times with some of the female staff at the park. Nate finds a special place in his heart for one of the young ladies, Elsie Brookes, who just happens to be his ranger boss’s daughter. Can two people from such varying backgrounds have anything in common?

Filled with a cast of characters that are dynamic and believable, the story brings to life the camaraderie and the ups and downs of life in a summer national park setting. Ms. Barnett takes on some serious topics in the book such as mental health issues, learning disabilities, anger and forgiveness, as well as the standard park issues of conservation and wildlife management. I thoroughly enjoyed the characters and the story. A perfect summer read that will get you in the mood for a trip to one of our beautiful national parks!

This ARC copy was received from Waterbrook and Netgalley.com. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

#EverFaithful #NetGalley

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It’s Release Day: The King’s Mercy by Lori Benton

Publication Date: June 2019

Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers

ARC copy from Author and Waterbrook

“In every ending,” Alex said, “there’s also a beginning. That’s a thing I’ve learned.”

–Alex MacKinnon

 

Impeccably written and well developed, The King’s Mercy is complex and filled with descriptive detail. I loved the book’s depth and voice and the way the story stays in my head.  This sixth novel from author Lori Benton brings together an unlikely pair; Alex MacKinnon, a bitter young man exiled from his native Scotland and sold into indenture and Joanna Carey, a hard working young woman  dedicated to doing the right things in life while living amidst slavery at her stepfather’s plantation in North Carolina.

The book begins in 1747, a complex and changing time during our nation’s history.  The story offers a vivid portrayal of early life in the Piedmont of North Carolina. The setting brings the reader right into the working world of the plantation alongside the characters and eventually travels to the Native American world of the Cherokee as well.  The primary characters are sincere, strong, and memorable, and in addition, the secondary characters have depth and add much to the story.

The book does not hesitate to tackle some deep issues like child abuse, slavery, the loss of personal freedoms, and the struggle of faith during difficult times.  Explore the themes of grace and mercy woven through this book as Alex and Joanna show resiliency and ingenuity to overcome their difficulties and move on to a different way of life.

I highly recommend this book to readers of historical fiction and inspirational fiction.  The book is truly an amazing read.

I received this book from Waterbrook and the author. The above thoughts and opinions I have expressed are wholly my own.

#TheKingsMercy  #NetGalley

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A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer

Publication Date: April 2019

Publisher: Waterbrook

ARC copy from Netgalley.com and Waterbrook

“My mam, she b’lieves real strong that God don’t waste nothin’. That all things is s’posed to wo’k  fo’ good. But I ain’t b’lieved it ‘til right now.”

–Quincy

A story of class, racism, faith, and family! This story set in Atlanta, Georgia in the year 1895 centers around the Cotton states and International Exposition, a huge exhibit with multiple states playing a role over a three month period. The jobs generated by the exhibition offer new opportunities to a variety of individuals and impact their lives in a multitude of ways.

The primary characters in the novel all work at the Exposition in diverse positions, from groundskeeper to silk weaver. Laurel Millard, the youngest sister from a family with modest means, looks to the Exposition for a job as a weaver to broaden her horizons and meet some other young people. Willie Sharp, a polite, handsome young man, gets a job as a security officer in order to pay for rehabilitation care for his father who has had a stroke. Langdon Rochester, wealthy son and heir apparent to the Rochester Steam-Powered Engines, works the Exposition to avoid being in the office under his father’s scrutiny. Quincy Tate, a young man from a large, very poor family, is trying to help his family out and find out about himself.  The characters are each in search of something that they hope to find along the way. They are pretty conventional characters for the time period. A few of them are not very likeable. However, they each played a role in the story.

The novel draws to an end as the exposition nears its completion. The ending felt a bit forced as it seemed that a great deal happened in a short time period. However, it was a satisfying ending with a great many lessons learned by the characters along the way. The historical detail regarding the exposition and the social issues of the time were interesting. Readers of Christian historical fiction should enjoy this novel.

This ARC copy was received from Waterbrook Multnomah and Netgalley.com. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

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#ASilkenThread  #NetGalley

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Where the Fire Falls by Karen Barnett

Series: A Vintage National Park Novel

Publication Date:  June 2018

Waterbrook

ARC  from Waterbrook and Netgalley.com

 “For three years he’d explored Yosemite and the High Sierra, hoping for a word from God about his failed calling. Nothing so far.”

                                                                   –Thoughts from Clark Johnson

Three years wandering through Yosemite and the adjoining area as a guide had certainly given Clark Johnson plenty of time to think about his situation. As his time as a guide draws to an end, Clark’s last guided tour includes Olivia Rutherford, a beautiful young artist hired to paint scenes from the park for Scenic Magazine, a national publication and Marcus and Sophie Vanderbilt, friends of the artist.

Clark, a nature loving solitary man, and Olivia, a polished social butterfly, couldn’t possibly have anything in common. However, as they begin working together they find that opposites often attract. Each of them has secrets they are keeping to themselves and until they find a way to be honest with each other, their friendship will go no further.

An appealing tale filled with adventure, a few unconventional characters, and some interesting twists will hold your interest! Once again the national park setting and the unique features of Yosemite add an additional dimension to the story. Karen Barnett finds a beautiful way to weave faith and inspiration into the story. An enjoyable read you won’t want to miss!

This ARC copy was received from Waterbrook and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

#Netgalley  #WhereTheFireFalls

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Across the Blue by Carrie Turansky

Publication Date: February 2018

Publisher: Waterbrook Multnomah

ARC copy from Netgalley and Waterbrook Multnomah

 

 

“It was time to remember Martha’s advice—trust the Lord and wait for Him to do His part.”

–Bella

Action, adventure, romance and a bit of mystery pull the reader right into this heartwarming novel, Across the Blue by Carrie Turansky. Set in Edwardian England in 1909 the story revolves around Isabella Grayson, daughter of Charles Grayson, the wealthy landowner of the Broadlands estate, and James Drake, a rather poverty stricken young pilot struggling to build airplanes and make a name for himself.

Opportune timing places James and his partner, Professor Thaddeus Steed directly in the path of Mr. Grayson and his lovely daughter. The pair meet when a flying mishap occurs at Broadlands. As common interests are discovered among the group, an acquaintance builds which benefits both James and Bella.

Rich with historic detail about early aviation during this time period, readers of historical fiction and those with an interest in aviation will be very much enjoy this book.  An interesting read that also delves into the obstacles faced by women who had an interest in careers at that time. A quick and enjoyable summer read!

This ARC copy was received from Waterbrook Multnomah and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.

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Many Sparrows by Lori Benton

 Publication Date: August 2017

Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers

ARC copy from Author and Waterbrook Multnomah

 

“A busted wagon, a vanished son, a brush shelter in the wilderness, a stranger to midwife—none of that would have figured into those plans.”

 Complex and rich with historic detail, this story engages the reader from the first page. The year is 1774 and Clare Inglesby, a young and very pregnant mother of one finds herself once again on the move. Her husband, Philip, has single handedly decided that it would be to their benefit to depart rural Virginia for the wilds of the settlement of Kentucky.

As the journey progresses, Clare battles through one conflict after another. Jeremiah Ring, a frontiersman and adopted Shawnee, arrives in Clare’s life at a time when she most needs help. Through the disappearance of her husband and son, Jacob, to surviving life in an Indian village, Clare looks to find someone in whom she can place her trust. As Clare continually struggles to force her will, she will eventually remember how to trust and who to trust. 

The book touched this reader deeply. The emotions are raw.  I wanted to cry and to pray for this woman Clare many time during the book. The characters have a depth of spirit and strength that embodies the true spirit of early Americans and many Native Americans. Read the novel to discover how Clare finds the patience to realize that our time is not always God’s time and how she resolves the issue of her missing son.

I received this book free from Waterbrook Multnomah and the author. I was not required to write a positive review. The above thoughts and opinions I have expressed are wholly my own.

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